click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
schools of thought on how to deal with israel. mark perry is a foreign policy analyst who remains close contact with the hamas leadership. >> abu mazen has gambled very explicitly and said very explicitly that there will be no violence against israel and he will negotiate in good faith with israel. the problem is that hasn't gotten him anywhere. hamas has a totally different approach and their approach is resistant. they believe israel will only come to the table when they feel pain. >> warner: a bring number of palestinians see justification for that belief. last november a week of palestinian rocket fire from gaza and israeli air strikes led to an egyptian-brokered cease-fire between hamas and israel. as part of that, some israeli restrictions on gaza were eased. the year before, hamas secured the release of a thousand prisoners from israeli jails in return for handing over gilad shalit, the israeli soldier it kidnapped in 2006. >> it has sent a clear message to the palestinian people if you abduct soldiers the they will be released but if you sign agreements about w us about releasin
. and susan glasser, executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. it seems as john kerry hop scotchs around the region, all he is encountering are rocks and hard places. am i right? >> yes, you are right about that. i mean, this is a region i think that actually has been crying out for a bit more u.s. engagement, but that doesn't mean that it's going to be easy. the secretary kerry clearly shows he's ready to be engaged but, you know, he's walking into a situation in iraq where the united states has already withdrawn its troops in afghanistan where we're in the process, and that means we are diminishing influence in both of those places. we still have interests there but diminishing influence. syria, a very, very hot conflict. the united states has been reluctant to get more involved, and then... and iran, of course, difficult negotiations with, you know, not necessarily any sign of progress. and then on top of all of that, secretary kerry has shown that he wants to take on the israeli-palestinian issue and see if he can make progress where others have not. >> ifill: what does his schedule,
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)